610.952.7524 lindsay@papernposh.com
The number one question couples ask me is “here is our situation….how do we word this invitation?” While a seemingly daunting task, wording an invitation is pretty simple. While there is no such thing as “one size fits all” when it comes to wedding invitation language, all you have to do is follow a few rules of etiquette and basic grammar. First, who is hosting the wedding? In the wedding industry the person “hosting” is typically the person “paying” for the ceremony and reception. If the Brides’ parents are hosting then the first few lines of the invitation would read:

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hoffman request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter Lindsay Diane to David Joshua Liebman

correct wording for wedding invitationsWere the families want to name the groom’s parents but not include them as a host, they may identify the groom as “son of” the groom’s parents.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hoffman request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter Lindsay Diane to David Joshua Son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Liebman

However, more and more I see that the groom’s family is either sending a sizable check to the bride’s family, or perhaps paying for all of or a portion of the catering bill, band, flowers, etc. In that case it may be more appropriate to include the groom’s parents as a “host”:

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Frank Hoffman along with Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Liebman request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children Lindsay Diane and David Joshua

Weddings are also becoming a family affair, where everyone is chipping in to pay for the event. The bride, the groom, their parents, and step parents. In that situation we might say:

Together with their parents (or families) Lindsay Diane Hoffman and David Joshua Liebman request the honour of your presence at their marriage Or The honour of your presence is requested at the marriage of Lindsay Diane Hoffman and David Joshua Liebman

ideal wedding invitation wording and language“Honour/honor of your presence” or “pleasure of your company”? “Honour/honor of your presence” is typically used when the wedding ceremony is held in a house of worship. “Pleasure of your company” covers pretty much everything else. While often used, the phrase “cordially invited” improper for a wedding invitation. Honor or honour is strictly preference… how traditional do you want to go? If your wedding is a bit more traditional than the old English way of spelling honour is the way to go. If not, then “honor” is a better choice. The rest of the invitation will follow a standard pattern; day and date, year, time, location, city and state. If your wedding and reception are in the same venue, name your venue and then at the bottom of the invitation say “dinner and dancing to follow” or “reception to follow.” For example:

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Frank Hoffman along with Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Liebman request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children Lindsay Diane and David Joshua Saturday, the nineteenth of June Two thousand seventeen at four o’clock The Museum Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Reception to follow

example of good wording on a wedding invitationDates and times should be spelled out, such as “Sunday, the first of June” and “Two thousand eighteen” and “four o’clock.” The words “in the afternoon” or “in the evening” are not necessary. There is no “and” when spelling out the year. For example, “Two thousand nineteen” not “Two thousand and nineteen.” Do not capitalize every line, only proper names and the year. Only include the address of the venue if you think your guests won’t be able to find it on their own. If you must list an attire (everyone has that cousin who will show up in jorts and a Hawaiian shirt) list it on the bottom right hand side of the invitation or reception card. Good luck!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This