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10 Examples of Great Wedding Invitation Wording

10 Examples of Great Wedding Invitation Wording

The wording on your wedding invitation is important—it’s one of the first things your guests will associate with your wedding, and with a little thought and creativity, it can set the right tone for what’s to come. However, it’s easy to get lost in the sea of options or just settle for a traditional approach that doesn’t really reflect your wedding or who you are. To help you navigate the different approaches to wedding invitations, we have compiled a list of 10 examples of truly great wedding invitation wording, running the gamut from formal and traditional to informal and personal.

Traditional Wedding Invitation Wording

Here is a wedding invitation that follows the traditional wording and format. You will notice that, in this case, the bride’s family is hosting the wedding. Also note that the last name of the bride is different from that of the parents and is included. Traditional wording such as this is elegant and straightforward, and definitely for the more conventional occasion. This wording best suits a formal, traditional wedding.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Mary Jane Jones
to
Mr. Matthew Johnson
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock
First Presbyterian Church
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Challenging Situation
Our next example of an excellent way to word a traditional wedding invitation involves a situation where the bride and groom want to include the names of both their parents on the invitation, but one set of parents is divorced. Remember that no matter how complicated a family situation may be, there is still a way to word the invitation gracefully.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
request the honour of your presence
at the marriage of their daughter
Mary Jane
to
Mr. James Johnson
son of Ms. Amy Johnson
Mr. Matthew Johnson
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock
First Presbyterian Church
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Note that both of the above invitations utilize the British spelling of the word “honor”: honour. This sets a very formal tone for the wedding.

Including Both Sets of Parents

This example includes the parents of both the bride and the groom, and illustrates very well how to handle situations where the groom and his father share the same name. As in the previous example, this follows a more traditional approach to a wedding invitation.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
request the pleasure of your company
at the marriage of their daughter
Mary Jane
to
James Paul Johnson, Jr.
son of
Mr. and Mrs. James P. Johnson, Sr.
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock
Oak Hill Plantation
Charleston, South Carolina
Cocktails, Dinner, and Dancing to Follow
Black Tie
Extremely Formal
This example is an extremely formal wording for an invitation where the wedding is not taking place at a church. Note that it also includes both sets of parents.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
request the pleasure of your company
at the marriage of their daughter
Mary Jane
to
Mr. Matthew Johnson
son of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock
Blackstone Hall
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Dinner and dancing to follow
Formal Attire
The term “formal attire” is used in place of “black tie,” which is a more inclusive term (women typically don’t wear black ties to weddings) while lending a bit more formality to the event.

A Slightly Different Approach

Sometimes the bride and groom want to include both sets of parents on the wedding invitation as the hosts of the wedding. The wording of this invitation serves as a good example of how that can be handled.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
along with Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson
request the honor of your presence
at the marriage of their children
Mary Jane
and
Matthew Joshua
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock
Blackstone Hall
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This invitation makes it clear that both parents are hosting, and you might also notice the use of the less formal spelling of “honor.”

Breaking the Mold

This invitation keeps the focus entirely on the couple being married and has a far less formal tone than the other examples we have looked at so far.

Together with their families
Mary Jane Smith
and
James Paul Johnson
Invite you to share in their wedding celebration
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock in the evening
Oak Hill Plantation
Charleston, South Carolina
Cocktails and Dinner Reception to follow
The parents are mentioned, but no names are given. It might be that both sets of parents are contributing to the cost of the wedding, or that the bride and groom are handling the expenses themselves.

Elegance

The wording of this invitation combines tradition and elegance extremely well while focusing attention on the bride and groom.
Together with their parents

Mary Jane Smith
and
James Paul Johnson
Request the pleasure of your company
As they exchange wedding vows
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock in the evening
Oak Hill Plantation
Charleston, South Carolina
Adult Reception to Follow
You cannot help but love the line “as they exchange wedding vows.” Especially given the location, guests are sure to conjure scenes of old-fashioned ladies and gentlemen in their Sunday best, a romantic and sweet ceremony, and dancing until the sun goes down.

Just the Facts

Here is one of the simplest, most concisely worded invitations that you are likely to see.

The honour of your presence is requested
at the marriage of
Mary Jane Smith
And
James Paul Johnson
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock in the evening
First Presbyterian Church
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
There is no mention of parents, and yet the invitation still has a very old-fashioned feel with a strong sense of formality. Guests can expect a classic, elegant celebration that really focuses on the couple rather than a lot of fanfare or excessive, over-the-top décor.

Traditional Catholic Wedding Invitation Wording

The beautiful wording of this invitation sets the tone for a very traditional wedding and includes both parents. It clearly reflects the deep faith of the couple being united and will feel especially inclusive to family members who share the same faith.

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith
request the honour of your presence
at the nuptial mass uniting their daughter
Mary Jane
to
Mr. Matthew Johnson
son of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson
in the sacrament of holy matrimony
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at five o’clock
Holy Trinity Catholic Church
New York, New York
Joyful and Informal
Here is a wedding invitation that is informal yet still respectful, and exudes the joy of the happy couple. The wording feels youthful, modern, and airy. This invitation does an excellent job of reflecting the personalities of the couple involved and serves as prime example of how to do an informal wedding invitation.

Mary Jane Smith
and
James Paul Johnson
happily invite you to share their best day ever
as they join in marriage
Saturday, the fifteenth of August
two thousand eighteen
at half past five o’clock in the evening
Oak Hill Country Club
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Reception to Follow
Contact Paper & Posh Today
Whether you want a formal, traditional style wedding invitation or a happy, informal announcement of your upcoming marriage, the staff here at Paper & Posh are ready to help you. Remember that the wording of your invitation is just as important as the colors and the paper that you choose. Contact us today for a complimentary consultation so we can learn about the vision, tone, and budget for your wonderful day. We will help you set the tone for you and your guests to enjoy the most wonderful day of your life!

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